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ACS’ journal NanoLetters

Using the mechanism bacteria use to shrug off powerful antibiotics, scientists have developed solar-powered nanofiltre that remove antibiotics from lakes and rivers twice as efficiently as the best existing technology. © American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON DC, US: Using the same devious mechanism that enables some bacteria to shrug off powerful antibiotics, scientists have developed solar-powered nanofiltres that remove antibiotics from the water in lakes and rivers twice as efficiently as the best existing technology. Their report appears in ACS’ journal NanoLetters.

Researchers, David Wendell and Vikram Kapoor explained that antibiotics from toilets and other sources find their way into lakes and rivers, with traces appearing in 80 per cent of waterways. Those antibiotics foster emergence of new antibiotic-resistant bacteria, while harming beneficial microbes in ways that can degrade aquatic environments and food chains. Filters containing activated carbon can remove antibiotics from effluent at municipal sewage treatment plants, before its release into waterways. But activated carbon is far from perfect. So the scientists looked for a better technology.

Scientists described the development and successful laboratory testing of capsule-like “vesicles” containing the very mechanism that enables bacteria to survive doses of antibiotics. This system pumps antibiotics out of bacterial cells before any damage can occur. Wendell and Kapoor turned it around, however, so that the system pumps antibiotics into the vesicles. That way, they can be collected and recycled or shipped for disposal. In addition to the pump, the vesicles contain a propulsion system driven by sunlight. The pump system could be adapted to clean hormones, heavy metals and other undesirable materials from water, the scientists stated.

© American Chemical Society News

Reference link - http://portal.acs.org/portal/acs/corg/content?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=PP_ARTICLEMAIN&node_id=223&content_id=CNBP_032897&use_sec=true&sec_url_var=region1&__uuid=b5c194de-5883-4e9f-8a34-910db97f8485

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