Robert Hare american chemist invented Galvanic deflagrator, Spiritoscope, Calorimeter

Robert Hare – inventor of oxyhydrogen blowtorch

Category : Personalities
Published by : Data Research Analyst, Worldofchemicals.com

Biography & Contributions

Robert Hare was an early American chemist born on January 17, 1781 – died on May 15, 1858. Hare primarily noted as an experimental chemist and inventor of experimental apparatus.

He was the first chemist to distill iridium, lime, magnesia, and platinum in fusible quantities. Hare devised a process to de-narcotize laudanum and a test to detect tiny quantities of opium.

He was the first chemist to distill iridium, lime, magnesia, and platinum in fusible quantities, and devised a process to de-narcotize laudanum and a test to detect tiny quantities of opium.

His first apparatus was a wooden board about four feet long, supported on a fulcrum about a foot from one end, and at the other end attached by a hook to a spring balance. A glass vessel filled with water was placed on the board near the fulcrum; a wire gauze cage attached to an independent support, not touching the glass at any point, was placed in the water. The medium would affect the balance by simply placing his hand into the wire cage.

Facts about oxyhydrogen

Oxyhydrogen is a mixture of hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2) gases. This gaseous mixture is used for torches to process refractory materials and was the first gaseous mixture used for welding. Oxyhydrogen will combust when brought to its autoignition temperature. For the stoichiometric mixture, 2:1 hydrogen:oxygen, at normal atmospheric pressure, autoignition occurs at about 570°C.

Oxyhydrogen blowpipe is the device which uses this oxyhydrogen gas mixture. It produced a flame hot enough to melt such refractory materials as platinum, porcelain, fire brick, and corundum, and was a valuable tool in several fields of science. It is used in the Verneuil process to produce synthetic corundum.

Oxyhydrogen is often mentioned in conjunction with vehicles that claim to use water as a fuel. The most common and decisive counter-argument against producing this gas on board to use as a fuel or fuel additive is that more energy is needed to split water molecules than is recouped by burning the resulting gas.

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