How to Get Rid of Ants in the Kitchen with Borax? - WorldOfChemicals

How to Get Rid of Ants in the Kitchen with Borax?

Category : General Chemicals
Published by : Data Research Analyst, Worldofchemicals.com

Some times when we are in a hurry to go out or at the end of the party; general human tendency will forget to keep food items like cakes, sweets or sugary items in the refrigerator. Eventually, this makes ants invade into our kitchen or hall, as ants are sugarholic. Ants have been much less annoying as fleas, cockroaches and other pests but still, ants make us annoy in certain situations. Then we start to think about to get rid of them from our surroundings.

There are many materials and techniques to avoid ants invasion, out of that there is an inexpensive and easy method is the use of borax and sugar.

Borax is white, consisting of soft colorless crystals and it is an important boron compound, a mineral, and a salt of boric acid. Borax is also known as sodium borate/sodium tetraborate/disodium tetraborate with the molecular formula Na2B4O7·10H2O. It kills ants by the following mechanism.

This compound may cause dehydration of insects and change the digestive tract system, resulting in their departure. Through this process, borax works as an effective agent to kill ants along with other household pests.

Borax has a broad range of applications. It is a major component of many laundry detergents, our day to day cosmetics, and enamel glazes. It is also used to make buffer solutions in a biochemistry laboratory, and as a fire retardant, as an antifungal compound, in the manufacture of fibreglass, as a flux in metallurgy, neutron capture shields for radioactive sources, a texturing agent in cooking, and as a precursor for other boron compounds. In the artisanal gold mining process, the borax method is sometimes used as a substitute for toxic mercury in the gold extraction process.

Borax is also used in various household laundry and cleaning products, tooth bleaching formulas. Borates in combination with suitable polymer bed are used to chromatograph non-glycosylated haemoglobin differentially from glycosylated haemoglobin.

Buy excess Borax for a discounted price. 

To contact the author mail: articles@worldofchemicals.com

© WOC Article


www.worldofchemicals.com uses cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. X