Researchers applying new imaging technique fornanofluid dynamics problem

Imaging flow of nanofluids

9:23 AM, 30th June 2014
Nanofluids
This artistic rendering depicts fluid-filled nanotubes changing with time. Caltech researchers used four-dimensional electron microscopy to visualize and monitor the flow of molten lead within single zinc oxide nanotubes in real time and space.

CALIFORNIA, US: Nanofluids, fluids containing nanometer-sized particles, do not always behave as our experiences with the macro-world might lead us to expect. Water, for example, seems to flow much faster within carbon nanotubes than classical physics says should be possible. Now, researchers have found a way to directly image nanofluids.

Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have done just that by applying a new imaging technique called four-dimensional (4D) electron microscopy to the nanofluid dynamics problem. Ahmed Zewail, the Linus Pauling Professor of Chemistry and Ulrich Lorenz, Postdoctoral scholar in chemistry, described how they visualized and monitored the flow of molten lead within a single zinc oxide nanotube in real time and space.

The 4D microscopy technique was developed in the Physical Biology Center for Ultrafast Science and Technology at Caltech, created and directed by Zewail to advance understanding of the fundamental physics of chemical and biological behavior.

In 4D microscopy, a stream of ultra-fast-moving electrons bombards a sample in a carefully timed manner. Each electron scatters off the sample, producing a still image that represents a single moment, just a femtosecond - or a millionth of a billionth of a second - in duration. Millions of the still images can then be stitched together to produce a digital movie of nanoscale motion.

In the new work, Lorenz and Zewail used single laser pulses to melt the lead cores of individual zinc oxide nanotubes and then, using 4D microscopy, captured how the hot pressurized liquid moved within the tubes - sometimes splitting into multiple segments, producing tiny droplets on the outside of the tube, or causing the tubes to break. Lorenz and Zewail also measured the friction experienced by the liquid in the nanotube.

“These observations are particularly significant because visualizing the behavior of fluids at the nanoscale is essential to our understanding of how materials and biological channels effectively transport liquids,” said Zewail.

© Caltech News

0 Comments

Login

Your Comments (Up to 2000 characters)
Please respect our community and the integrity of its participants. WOC reserves the right to moderate and approve your comment.

Related News


Dow to add polyether polyols facility in Thailand

MIDLAND, US/MAP TA PHUT, THAILAND: Dow Polyurethanes, a business of The Dow Chemical Company, will add a polyether polyols facility at the Company&rsq ...

Read more
Enterprise to expand LPG export terminal in Houston, US

HOUSTON, US: Enterprise Products Partners LP announced an additional expansion of its LPG export terminal located on the Houston Ship Channel that wil ...

Read more
KMG appoints new President and CEO, Christopher Fraser

HOUSTON, US: The Board of Directors of KMG Chemicals, Inc, a global provider of specialty chemicals to select markets, has appointed Christopher T Fra ...

Read more
Air Liquide completes the acquisition of Voltaix

PARIS, FRANCE: Air Liquide has completed the acquisition of Voltaix, a company specializing in molecules for electronics, based in the United States. ...

Read more
Dow, YPF to invest $188 million to develop shale gas in Argentina

BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA: YPF SA, Argentina’s largest company, and Dow Chemical Co’s Argentine unit signed a final accord to invest $188 mi ...

Read more
Foster Wheeler bags consultancy services contract pipeline and power plant projects in Peru

ZUG, SWITZERLAND: Foster Wheeler’s Global Engineering and Construction Group subsidiary has been awarded a contract by Wood Mackenzie Limited to ...

Read more
www.worldofchemicals.com uses cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. X