Researchers applying new imaging technique fornanofluid dynamics problem

Imaging flow of nanofluids

9:23 AM, 30th June 2014
Nanofluids
This artistic rendering depicts fluid-filled nanotubes changing with time. Caltech researchers used four-dimensional electron microscopy to visualize and monitor the flow of molten lead within single zinc oxide nanotubes in real time and space.

CALIFORNIA, US: Nanofluids, fluids containing nanometer-sized particles, do not always behave as our experiences with the macro-world might lead us to expect. Water, for example, seems to flow much faster within carbon nanotubes than classical physics says should be possible. Now, researchers have found a way to directly image nanofluids.

Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have done just that by applying a new imaging technique called four-dimensional (4D) electron microscopy to the nanofluid dynamics problem. Ahmed Zewail, the Linus Pauling Professor of Chemistry and Ulrich Lorenz, Postdoctoral scholar in chemistry, described how they visualized and monitored the flow of molten lead within a single zinc oxide nanotube in real time and space.

The 4D microscopy technique was developed in the Physical Biology Center for Ultrafast Science and Technology at Caltech, created and directed by Zewail to advance understanding of the fundamental physics of chemical and biological behavior.

In 4D microscopy, a stream of ultra-fast-moving electrons bombards a sample in a carefully timed manner. Each electron scatters off the sample, producing a still image that represents a single moment, just a femtosecond - or a millionth of a billionth of a second - in duration. Millions of the still images can then be stitched together to produce a digital movie of nanoscale motion.

In the new work, Lorenz and Zewail used single laser pulses to melt the lead cores of individual zinc oxide nanotubes and then, using 4D microscopy, captured how the hot pressurized liquid moved within the tubes - sometimes splitting into multiple segments, producing tiny droplets on the outside of the tube, or causing the tubes to break. Lorenz and Zewail also measured the friction experienced by the liquid in the nanotube.

“These observations are particularly significant because visualizing the behavior of fluids at the nanoscale is essential to our understanding of how materials and biological channels effectively transport liquids,” said Zewail.

© Caltech News

0 Comments

Login

Your Comments (Up to 2000 characters)
Please respect our community and the integrity of its participants. WOC reserves the right to moderate and approve your comment.

Related News


BASF’s plastic materials used to build three wheeled vehicle

LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY: With the help of BASF’s versatile plastic materials, the new three-wheeled concept vehicle 05GEN from Yamaha Motor Co Ltd ...

Read more
Scientists produce green electronic materials with synthetic biology

AMHERST, US: Scientists at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst have genetically designed a new strain of bacteria that spins out extremely thin a ...

Read more
Customer demand is for sulphur-free sugar manufacturing

In an interview Ian Struggles, chief executive, Pro Tech International with Chemical Today magazine, discusses his entrepreneurial journey, facing all ...

Read more
The unorganized sector - a threat to the coolant industry

In an interview, Amresh Kumar Singh, assistant general manager (marketing), India Glycols Ltd, with Shivani Mody, Editor, Chemical Today magazine, tal ...

Read more
Fluor bags maintenance alliance contract for power plants in US

IRVING, US: Fluor Corporation has been awarded a five-year maintenance alliance contract with a Southern Company subsidiary for its North Georgia and ...

Read more
Vopak to operate Chevron’s oil terminal in US

ROTTERDAM, NETHERLANDS: Royal Vopak has entered into a long-term agreement with Chevron Corporation to manage and operate for Chevron its existing 509 ...

Read more