University Manchester Scientists found new method in treating pancreatic cancer

More promising treatment for pancreatic cancer

11:32 AM, 23rd December 2013
University of Manchester Cancer Research Centre new research on pancreatic cancer
pancreatic cancer cellsweb.

MANCHESTER, UK: Scientists from The University of Manchester, part of the Manchester Cancer Research Centre, believe they have discovered a new way to make chemotherapy treatment more effective for pancreatic cancer patients. Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer with poor prognosis and limited treatment options and is highly resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. But researchers believe they have found an effective strategy for selectively killing pancreatic cancer while sparing healthy cells which could make treatment more effective.

“Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and deadly cancers. Most patients develop symptoms after the tumour has spread to other organs. To make things worse, pancreatic cancer is highly resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Clearly a radical new approach to treatment is urgently required. We wanted to understand how the switch in energy supply in cancer cells might help them survive,” said Dr Jason Bruce, Physiological Systems and Disease Research Group, University of Manchester. Bruce led research.

The research found pancreatic cancer cells may have their own specialised energy supply that maintains calcium levels and keeps cancer cells alive. Maintaining a low concentration of calcium within cells is vital to their survival and this is achieved by calcium pumps on the plasma membrane. This calcium pump, known as PMCA, is fuelled using ATP – the key energy currency for many cellular processes.

All cells generate energy from nutrients using two major biochemical energy “factories,” mitochondria and glycolysis. Mitochondria generate approximately 90 per cent of the cells’ energy in normal healthy cells. However, in pancreatic cancer cells there is a shift towards glycolysis as the major energy source. It is thought that the calcium pump may have its own supply of glycolytic ATP, and it is this fuel supply that gives cancer cells a survival advantage over normal cells.

Scientists used cells taken from human tumours and looked at the effect of blocking each of these two energy sources in turn.

The study shows that blocking mitochondrial metabolism had no effect. However, when they blocked glycolysis, they saw a reduced supply of ATP which inhibited the calcium pump, resulting in a toxic calcium overload and ultimately cell death.

“It looks like glycolysis is the key process in providing ATP fuel for the calcium pump in pancreatic cancer cells. Although an important strategy for cell survival, it may also be their major weakness. Designing drugs to cut off this supply to the calcium pumps might be an effective strategy for selectively killing cancer cells while sparing normal cells within the pancreas,” said Dr Bruce.

© University of Manchester News

0 Comments

Login

Your Comments (Up to 2000 characters)
Please respect our community and the integrity of its participants. WOC reserves the right to moderate and approve your comment.

Related News


Haldor Topsoe appoints Dr Bjerne S Clausen as new CEO

LYNGBY, DENMARK: Since September 2007, Haldor Topsoe CEO, Niels Kegel Sorensen has handed in his resignation from his position. The board has accepted ...

Read more
Explosion at Shandong Liaherd Chemical plant in China kills 14

  BEIJING, CHINA: Fourteen workers were killed and five more injured Saturday in a chemical plant explosion in east China’s Shandong Provi ...

Read more
Study of 22nd amino acid - pyrrolysine

  GARCHING, GERMANY: Proteins are key players in many vital processes in living organisms. They transport substances, catalyze chemical reaction ...

Read more
Can carbon foams replace nickel in battery?

HOUGHTON, US: Researchers at Michigan Technological University are working on carbon foams as key ingredient for battery. Actually, their design is a ...

Read more
Role of iron to activate oxygen in living system

  MENLO PARK, US: Oxygen performs many key functions in the body’s internal chemistry, but the life-sustaining molecule can’t do its ...

Read more
IHS acquires Purvin & Gertz

  ENGLEWOOD, US: IHS Inc has acquired Purvin & Gertz Inc, a well-established global advisory and market research firm that provides technica ...

Read more