RMIT University discovered new chemical compound be used in cancer treatment

New promising compound for cancer treatment

4:19 AM, 11th February 2014
RMIT University research on  new chemical compound
RMIT University researchers have synthesized a promising compound for cancer treatment.

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA: Researcher at RMIT University have synthesized a promising compound for cancer treatment. Dr Dan Balan, from the School of Applied Sciences at RMIT, said 15-aza-Salicylihalamide A analogue had demonstrated potent activity against several leukaemia cell lines. Salicylihalamide A is cytotoxic - or a toxin which is known to destroy cells and which also provides a defense for the sea sponge.

“Salicylihalamide A is an interesting natural marine product that has been isolated from a marine sponge of the genus Haliclona, collected from waters around Rottnest Island, 18 km off the coast of southern Western Australia. My goal was to synthesise the chemical in the laboratory in the form of a single aza-salicylihalamide A analogue molecule,” said Dr Balan.

The aza-salicylihalamide A analogue molecules were then exposed to NCI-60 leukaemia cell lines, and exhibited antiproliferating effects on the group of cells at highly diluted, or ‘sub-molar,’ concentrations.

“15-aza-Salicylihalamide A Analogue has proven to be very active against various types of cancer, but it was clearly most active against HL-60, which is acute promyelocytic leukaemia,” he added.

Other findings revealed it to be an inhibitor of vacuolar ATPase and proton pumps, frequently found in metastatic cancer cells - which are cancer cells that have migrated through the bloodstream from more advanced tumours.

“The molecule was synthesised in a short molecular sequence that could be easily produced in very large volumes for drug production,” said Dr Balan.

He explained there will be further research to investigate its effectiveness on different cancers, potentially leading to extensive drug development.

 

© RMIT University News

0 Comments

Login

Your Comments (Up to 2000 characters)
Please respect our community and the integrity of its participants. WOC reserves the right to moderate and approve your comment.

Related News


Towards new quantum technology from defects in diamond

WASHINGTON DC, US: New research shows that a remarkable defect in synthetic diamond produced by chemical vapor deposition allows researchers to measur ...

Read more
Uralkali acquires 25 pc stake in port terminal in Brazil

MOSCOW, RUSSIA/ANTONINA, BRAZIL: Uralkali, world’s largest potash producer, has acquired 25 per cent in Equiplan Participacoes SA, which is the ...

Read more
Mitsui announces restructuring plan, closes few production facilities

TOKYO, JAPAN: Japanese chemical major Mitsui Chemicals Inc has announced a major restructuring plan, which involves closing down of some production fa ...

Read more
Diamond sheet may be obtained without pressure

HOUSTON, US: Perfect sheets of diamond a few atoms thick appear to be possible even without the big squeeze that makes natural gems. Scientists call t ...

Read more
New promising approach to targeted drug delivery

WASHINGTON DC, US: Many of today’s therapeutic drugs cause potential side effects. These effects often occur when a drug is active throughout th ...

Read more
Linde to supply hydrogen to Nynas’ refinery in Hamburg, Germany

MUNICH, GERMANY: The Linde Group has signed a long-term contract with Nynas AB, one of the world leaders in the naphthenic specialty oils (NSP) and th ...

Read more