AkzoNobel build alkoxylation facility in Ningbo, China

AkzoNobel to build alkoxylation facility in Ningbo, China

11:52 AM, 3rd March 2015
AkzoNobel to build alkoxylation facility in Ningbo, China

AMSTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS: AkzoNobel’s Specialty Chemicals business recently broke ground on a new alkoxylation facility in Ningbo, China, bringing the company’s total investment in the strategic multi-site to more than €400 million. As well as contributing to AkzoNobel’s position as one of the leading surfactant producers in China, the new facility also creates a more sustainable footprint in the region and will enable the company to better serve its customers.

The Ningbo multi-site covers around 50 hectares and accommodates production for chelates, ethylene amines, ethylene oxide, organic peroxides and Bermocoll cellulose derivatives. Surface Chemistry’s latest investment will increase annual capacity by nearly 18,000 tonne, mainly catering for domestic demand in China.

As well as contributing to AkzoNobel’s position as one of the leading surfactant producers in China, the new facility also creates a more sustainable footprint in the region. The added alkoxylation capacity (the process of reacting a fatty amine with ethylene oxide to make ethoxylated amines) will enable the company to better serve its customers in the agrochemical, oilfield and personal care markets.

“Our investment in this new plant is further proof of our ongoing commitment to China, which is one of our most strategically important markets. The new facility also gives added momentum to our organic growth ambitions, as well as enabling us to continue expanding our manufacturing footprint in Asia,” said Werner Fuhrmann, Executive Committee member responsible for Specialty Chemicals, AkzoNobel.

 

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