BASF CSM form bio-based succinic acid production joint venture

BASF and CSM form bio-based succinic acid production joint venture

3:01 PM, 1st August 2011
BASF and CSM form bio-based succinic acid production joint venture
Dr Andreas Kreimeyer, Member of the Board of Executive Directors, BASF.

LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY/DIEMEN, THE NETHERLANDS: BASF SE and Purac, subsidiary of CSM NV will form a joint venture for the production of bio-based succinic acid. The complementary strengths in fermentation and downstream processing led to the development of a sustainable and highly efficient manufacturing process based on a proprietary micro organism. The demand for succinic acid is anticipated to grow strongly in the next years. Main drivers are expected to be bioplastics, chemical intermediates, solvents, polyurethanes and plasticizers.

The companies have been conducting research under a joint development agreement on bio-based succinic acid since 2009. Critical steps of the jointly developed production process have been validated in several successful production campaigns. The resulting volumes were used to evaluate the market.

The newly developed process results in a positive eco-footprint and makes bio-based succinic acid an economically and ecologically attractive alternative to petrochemical substitutes.

“Until now our partnership has been successful and moving towards a joint venture will strengthen our goal to become the leading supplier in the succinic acid market,” said Dr Andreas Kreimeyer, Member of the Board of Executive Directors, BASF.

“We aim to be the first commercial producer in the market with a 25,000 tonne capacity fermentation production plant at the Purac site near Barcelona, Spain, with the intention to start up by 2013 at the latest,” said Gerard Hoetmer, CEO, CSM. “In addition, we are already planning a world-scale plant with a capacity of 50,000 tons to account for the expected demand growth. This partnership has enormous potential as it leverages the combined competencies of two leading companies in their fields.”

© WOC News

 

0 Comments

Login

Your Comments (Up to 2000 characters)
Please respect our community and the integrity of its participants. WOC reserves the right to moderate and approve your comment.

Related News


Computational chemistry shows the way to safer bio fuels

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK: The word “Biofuel” sounds positively healthy. But even diesel based on organically grown corn can degrade into toxic ...

Read more
Penn chemists make first molecular binding measurement of radon

PHILADELPHIA, US: Even in trace quantities, the radioactive gas radon is very dangerous; it is second only to cigarette smoking as a cause of lung can ...

Read more
New test measures properties of polymer thin films and membranes

GAITHERSBURG, US: Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a measurement technique that reliably det ...

Read more
OSU pigment discovery expanding to new colours

CORVALLIS, US: Chemists at Oregon State University have discovered that the same crystal structure they identified two years ago to create what may be ...

Read more
New X-ray camera to reveal big secrets about how chemistry works

SWINDON, UNITED KINGDOM: Designed to record bursts of images at an unprecedented speed of 4.5 million frames per second, an innovative X-ray camera be ...

Read more
New spin on friction-stir

OAK RIDGE, US: Researchers Zhili Feng, Alan Frederic and Stan David in Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Materials S&T division have made si ...

Read more
www.worldofchemicals.com uses cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. X