Bayer, Rothamsted partner sustainable crop care solutions

Bayer, Rothamsted partner for sustainable crop care solutions

6:53 AM, 2nd August 2017
The partnership will work on Customized agronomic solutions for farmers to deliver sustainable agriculture.
The partnership will work on Customized agronomic solutions for farmers to deliver sustainable agriculture.

MONHEIM, GERMANY: Bayer AG and Rothamsted Research have entered into a strategic framework agreement to improve collaborations in scientific areas, that will support the development of more customized agronomic solutions for farmers.

Building on a track record of collaborations, the partners are forming this strategic alliance to support a digital revolution for detecting and managing biotic threats such as pests, pathogens and weeds more sustainably. Coordinated activities, in the laboratory and in the field, will generate the data, know-how, tools and technologies that help to support a transition to smarter crop protection.

The partners will work together in a number of research areas: from real-time detection of pests in the environment to understanding the evolution of resistance; and from the identification of new modes of action of insecticides to novel approaches to controlling pests.

“Crops are exposed to a wide range of both biotic and abiotic stresses, and we expect our enhanced collaboration with Rothamsted to help us develop a better understanding of how these factors can be more sustainably managed to reduce crop losses worldwide and manage resistance more effectively,” said Dr Adrian Percy, global head of research and development at crop science, a division of Bayer.

“Although research institutions such as ours can contribute much in addressing that challenge, we need to partner with others, including industry, to achieve real breakthroughs and have bigger impacts. This alliance will provide us with a whole new opportunity to work together on complex challenges, towards making farming more precise, more productive and more sustainable,” added Achim Dobermann, director and chief executive of Rothamsted.

“We are absolutely convinced that digital farming will revolutionize agriculture. New technologies that detect stress factors long before they become visible to the human eye can help farmers to make better-informed decisions earlier and more precisely. Fertilizer and crop protection can be applied at the best possible time and at the optimal dosage, using no more or less than needed by the plant,” said Tobias Menne, head of digital farming at Bayer.

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