Chemist’s technique identify fingerprint as male female

Chemist’s technique can identify a fingerprint as male or female

4:36 AM, 30th November 2015
Chemist’s technique can identify a fingerprint as male or female
A team of researchers have discovered a straightforward concept for identifying whether a culprit is male or female. It’s based on amino acid levels in fingerprints.

ALBANY, US: University at Albany research group, led by assistant chemistry prof Jan Halamek, is taking crime scene fingerprint identification to a new level.

Halamek and his team of researchers have discovered a straightforward concept for identifying whether a culprit is male or female. It’s based on the content in fingerprints specifically amino acids.

According to known literature, amino acid levels in the sweat of females are about twice as high as in males. There’s also a slightly different distribution, due mostly to hormonal differences. The same is true for amino acids left behind in fingerprints. Halamek’s research team has devised a simple method to back up these claims.

The team extracts amino acids from a fingerprint by transferring it onto a piece of plastic wrap. A hydrochloric acid solution is then placed onto the fingerprint, followed by heating. This process allows for the water-soluble amino acids to migrate into the acidic solution. From there, the team can easily view amino acid levels, distinguishing sex.

Halamek and his colleagues’ first tested this method on “mimicked fingerprint samples,” which they found to have a 99 percent accuracy of correct sex classification. From there, they set up a real crime scene scenario. Three female volunteers placed their fingerprints on five different surfaces, including a doorknob and a computer screen. Regardless of the surface type, Halamek’s team found it was possible to tell the fingerprint belonged to a woman.

“One of the main goals for this project was to move toward looking at the chemical content within the fingerprint, as opposed to relying on simply the fingerprint image,” said Halamek. “We do not intend to compete with DNA analysis or the databases used for identification. Instead we are aiming at differentiating between demographic groups, and more importantly, we are aiming at making use of fingerprints that are smudged or that don’t have an existing match.”

Halamek’s full study is published in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

© University at Albany News

0 Comments

Login

Your Comments (Up to 2000 characters)
Please respect our community and the integrity of its participants. WOC reserves the right to moderate and approve your comment.

Related News


Moonlighting molecules: finding new uses for old enzymes

CAMBRIDGE, UK: A collaboration between the University of Cambridge and MedImmune, the global biologics research and development arm of AstraZeneca, ha ...

Read more
BASF to expand engineering plastics compounding capacity in Europe

LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY: BASF SE said it is expanding compounding capacities for engineering plastics, to additionally produce up to 70,000 metric tonne ...

Read more
Pertamina, Saudi Aramco to jointly upgrade Indonesian refinery

JAKARTA, INDONESIA: PT Pertamina said that it has joined hands with state-owned oil company of Saudi Arabia, Saudi Aramco, in a $5.5 billion deal for ...

Read more
Pfizer to buy Allergan in $160 billion deal

NEW YORK CITY, US: Pfizer Inc said that it is in talks to buy Allergan Plc in a deal worth $160 billion, the combined company will be known as Pfizer ...

Read more
Clariant acquires 30 pc Beraca shares in health, personal care biz

MUTTENZ, SWITZERLAND: Clariant AG said it has closed strategic alliance with Beraca Ingredientes Naturais SA by acquiring 30 percent of Beraca’s ...

Read more
Shawcor acquires certain businesses of Canadian firm Flint

TORONTO, CANADA: Shawcor Ltd said it has acquired assets of the tubular inspection and management (TIM) and global poly businesses operated by Flint F ...

Read more
www.worldofchemicals.com uses cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. X