Chewing gum remove oral bacteria, finds new study

Chewing gum can remove oral bacteria, finds new study

11:34 AM, 27th January 2015
Chewing gum can remove oral bacteria, finds new study
Chewing gum can remove oral bacteria, finds new study.

LONDON, UK: Just 10 minutes of chewing gum can remove 100 million bacteria from your mouth, according to a new study which suggests chewing gum may be as good as flossing. Researchers at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands found that chewing gum can trap and remove bacteria from the oral cavity.

In the study, five biomedical engineering students were recruited to chew two different standard types of spearmint gum for various lengths of time ranging from 30 seconds to 10 minutes. Afterward, the gum was spit into a cup filled with sterile water to be analysed, reported ‘Medical Daily’. There were about 100 million bacteria detected on each piece of chewed up gum, with the number increasing as chewing time increased. However, after 30 seconds of chewing, the gum starts to lose its adhesiveness, meaning it traps fewer bacteria overall. “Trapped bacteria were clearly visualised in chewed gum using scanning-electron-microscopy,” researchers said in the paper published in the journal PLOS ONE.

Previous research has shown that using a new, clean toothbrush without any toothpaste can remove around 100 million colony-forming units per brush, which would put chewing of gum on a par with mechanical action of a toothbrush.

 

© TimesOfIndia News

0 Comments

Login

Your Comments (Up to 2000 characters)
Please respect our community and the integrity of its participants. WOC reserves the right to moderate and approve your comment.

Related News


Scientists explain alkali metal explosion

PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC: The chemistry behind dropping sodium into water and watching it explode may require a rethink, according to scientists in the ...

Read more
‘Predicted’ zeolites may fuel efficient processes

HOUSTON, US: Scientists at Rice University and the University of Minnesota have identified synthetic materials that may purify ethanol more efficientl ...

Read more
Scientists develop cost effective, self-cleaning electrochemical sensor

MILAN, ITALY: Scientists in Italy have engineered a cheap and simple electrochemical sensor that cleans itself when exposed to ultraviolet light. Thei ...

Read more
New drug could protect against nuclear radiation exposure

TENNESSEE, US: The 2011 Fukushima disaster was a stark reminder of the continuing dangers posed by nuclear fallout, highlighting the need for an appro ...

Read more
Sigma-Aldrich, VIB collaborate to provide translational research technologies

ST LOUIS, US: Sigma-Aldrich Corporation’s Research business unit, an industry leader in supporting translational researchers by supplying the pr ...

Read more
Sika to acquire Axson Technologies

BAAR, SWITZERLAND: Sika has entered into exclusive negotiations with Axson management and shareholders to acquire Axson Technologies, a leader in the ...

Read more
www.worldofchemicals.com uses cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. X