Researcher used Cigarette ashes removed arsenic from drinking water

Cigarette ashes can remove arsenic from drinking water

10:22 AM, 17th October 2014
Researcher used Cigarette ashes to removes arsenic from drinking water
Ashes from cigarettes can remove most of the arsenic in contaminated waters, a new study found.

WASHINGTON DC, US: Arsenic, a well-known poison, can be taken out of drinking water using sophisticated treatment methods. But in places that lack the equipment or technical know-how required to remove it, it still laces drinking water and makes people sick. To tackle this problem, scientists have come up with a new low-cost, simple way to remove arsenic using leftovers from another known health threat - cigarettes. They reported their method in ACS’ journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research.

Researcher Jiaxing Li and colleagues explained that naturally occurring and industry-related arsenic contaminates groundwater at high levels in many countries, including Chile, China, Hungary and Mexico. The odorless, tasteless element can cause skin discoloration, stomach pain, partial paralysis and a range of other serious health problems. While the technology for removing arsenic from water exists and is in widespread use in industrialized areas, it is expensive and impractical for rural and developing regions. Scientists have been exploring the use of natural waste materials such as banana peels and rice hulls for removing arsenic from water, but these so far have shown limited efficiency. Recognizing that the porous structure of cigarette ash could be better suited to this purpose, Li’s team decided to test it.

In a simple, inexpensive, one-step method, the researchers prepared cigarette ash with a coating of aluminum oxide. When they tested the material with contaminated ground water, they found it removed more than 96 per cent of the arsenic, reducing its levels to below the standard set by the World Health Organization. Because cigarette ashes are discarded in countries around the world and can be easily collected in places where public smoking is allowed, it could be part of a low-cost solution for a serious public health issue, they said.

 

© American Chemical Society News

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