Converting ash use in nuclear waste treatment, soil remediation

Converting ash for use in nuclear waste treatment, soil remediation

6:05 AM, 22nd January 2015
Converting ash for use in nuclear waste treatment, soil remediation

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM: Scientists suggest a new method to transform power plant ash into materials that could be used for nuclear waste treatment or soil remediation. The world’s power plants produce about 600 million tonne of coal ash every year. If nothing is done about it, this sort of waste might damage the environment. A group of scientists from Greece and Romania suggests a method to turn the ashes produced into an eco-friendly solution.

Ashes are chemically similar to volcanic precursors of natural zeolites. These are typical adsorbents in separation and refinery facilities. The scientists used ash taken from the Iasi power plant in Romania and through a simple, low-cost method were successful to produce adsorbents from it. They have modified the power plant ash by hydrothermal treatment and ultrasonic activation in an alkaline medium (5M NaOH). Furthermore they investigated the effectiveness of the new synthesized sorbents in removing certain metals (Ba, Cd, Cr, Cs, Eu and U) from aqueous solutions.

The results show that the new materials have enhanced properties with regards to the original ash and proved very efficient in removing hazardous metals from aqueous media. The sorption efficiency was as high as more zeolite formed.

This method could be a cheaper alternative e.g. for nuclear waste treatment or soil remediation while also reducing waste from power plants.

 

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