Flexible, self-powered wearable medical alert device

Flexible, self-powered wearable medical alert device

5:59 AM, 25th February 2015
Flexible, self-powered wearable medical alert device
The fever arm band can produce a sound akin to an alarm when it traces a high body temperature in a person. It is worn either directly on the skin or on top of clothes.

TOKYO, JAPAN: University of Tokyo researchers have developed a ‘fever alarm armband,’ a flexible, self-powered wearable device that sounds an alarm in case of high body temperature. The flexible organic components developed for this device are well-suited to wearable devices that continuously monitor vital signs including temperature and heart rate for applications in healthcare settings.

The new device developed by research groups lead by Professor Takayasu Sakurai at the Institute of Industrial Science and Professor Takao Someya at the Graduate School of Engineering combines a flexible amorphous silicon solar panel, piezoelectric speaker, temperature sensor, and power supply circuit created with organic components in a single flexible, wearable package.

Constant monitoring of health indicators such as heart rate and body temperature is the focus of intense interest in the fields of infant, elderly and patient care. Sensors for such applications need to be flexible and wireless for patient comfort, maintenance-free and not requiring external energy supply, and cheap enough to permit disposable use to ensure hygiene. Conventional sensors based on rigid components are unable to meet these requirements, so the researchers have developed a flexible solution that incorporates organic components that can be printed by an inkjet printer on a polymeric film.

The fever alarm armband incorporates several first-ever achievements. It is the first organic circuit able to produce a sound output, and the first to incorporate an organic power supply circuit. The former enables the device to provide audible information when the flexible thermal sensor detects a pre-set value within the ranges of 36.5 ºC to 38.5 ºC, while the latter increases the range of operational illumination by 7.3 times in indoor lighting conditions.

“Our fever alarm armband demonstrates that it is possible to produce flexible, disposable devices that can greatly enhance the amount of information available to carriers in healthcare settings. We have demonstrated the technology with a temperature sensor and fever alarm, but the system could also be adapted to provide audible feedback on body temperature, or combined with other sensors to register wetness, pressure or heart rate,” said Professor Someya.

 

© University of Tokyo News

0 Comments

Login

Your Comments (Up to 2000 characters)
Please respect our community and the integrity of its participants. WOC reserves the right to moderate and approve your comment.

Related News


Early consumption of peanuts could prevent allergy, finds new study

ILLINOIS, US: A new study suggests that peanut allergy can be prevented at a young age by embracing peanuts, not avoiding them. Eating peanut products ...

Read more
Sports car that runs on salt water!

ZURICH, SWITZERLAND: A company called nanoFlowcell has revealed a concept sports car which gets its energy from salt water and can run up to 621 miles ...

Read more
Brenntag, Dow Microbial Control expand distribution agreement for cosmetics business

MULHEIM AN DER RUHR, GERMANY: Brenntag, the global market leader in chemical distribution, announced the expansion of its distribution agreement with ...

Read more
Granules-OmniChem JV opens API facility in Visakhapatnam, India

VISAKHAPATNAM, INDIA: Granules-OmniChem Private Ltd, inaugurated their manufacturing facility for high-value active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) ...

Read more
Solvay to build specialty polymers resin facility in US

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM: Solvay is building a new specialty polymers resin unit in the United States, significantly expanding its production capacity of PEE ...

Read more
Formula milk poses higher arsenic risk to infants

WASHINGTON DC, US: In the first study of urinary arsenic in babies, Dartmouth College researchers have found that formula-fed infants had higher arsen ...

Read more
www.worldofchemicals.com uses cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. X