Merck develops new genome editing tool
X
Waste Management Expo 2020 MAR 12&13 BIEC, Bengaluru, India

Merck develops new genome editing tool

9:26 AM, 18th May 2017
Merck develops new genome editing tool
proxy-CRISPR, provides access to previously unreachable areas of the genome.

DARMSTADT, GERMANY: Merck has developed a new genome editing tool that makes CRISPR more efficient, flexible and specific, giving researchers more experimental options and faster results that can accelerate drug development and access to new therapies.

This new technique, called “proxy-CRISPR,” provides access to previously unreachable areas of the genome. Most natural CRISPR systems, found in bacteria, cannot work in human cells without significant re-engineering. However, proxy-CRISPR provides a rapid and simple method to increase their usability without the laborious need to re-engineer native CRISPR proteins.

The company has filed several patent applications on the proxy-CRISPR technology.

CRISPR genome editing technology is advancing treatment options for some of the toughest medical conditions faced today, including chronic illnesses and cancers for which there are limited or no treatment options. The applications of CRISPR are far ranging—from identifying genes associated with cancer to reversing mutations that cause blindness. CRISPR enables genome editing using an enzyme called Cas9 to cut DNA, but this has limited targeting abilities. This limitation led to Merck’s focus on proxy-CRISPR.

The new technology is a follow-on to Merck’s existing CRISPR applications. The company’s next suite of genome editing tools for the research community, to be launched later in 2017, will include novel and modified versions of Cas and Cas-like proteins.

“With more flexible and easy-to-use genome editing technologies, there is greater potential in research, bioprocessing and novel treatment modalities. As a leader in genome editing, Merck’s new technology is just one example of our commitment to solving challenges in the genome editing field, and we will continue to make CRISPR research a priority,” said Udit Batra, Member of the Merck executive board and CEO, life science.

© Worldofchemicals News

0 Comments

Login

Your Comments (Up to 2000 characters)
Please respect our community and the integrity of its participants. WOC reserves the right to moderate and approve your comment.

Related News


Ashland completes acquisition of Pharmachem for $660 million

COVINGTON, US: Ashland Global Holdings Inc (ASH) said that its subsidiary has completed the previously announced acquisition of privately owned P ...

Read more
ExxonMobil to enter Mexican fuels market, launches Mobil stations

MEXICO CITY, US: ExxonMobil Corporation plans to enter the Mexican fuels market with the launch of Mobil-branded stations and its new signature line o ...

Read more
Researchers use bacteria to convert methane into electricity

UNIVERSITY PARK, US: Transporting methane from gas wellheads to market provides multiple opportunities for this greenhouse gas to leak into the atmosp ...

Read more
Researchers discover new catalyst for efficient water splitting

HOUSTON, US: University of Houston (UH) physicists have discovered a new catalyst that can split water into hydrogen and oxygen, composed of easily av ...

Read more
Henkel to acquire sealing solution supplier in Germany

DUSSELDORF, GERMANY: Henkel AG & Company has signed an agreement to acquire Sonderhoff Holding GmbH, a supplier of high-impact sealing solutions f ...

Read more
KBR bags service contracts for EuroChem’s ammonia plant

HOUSTON, US: KBR Inc (KBR) has been awarded operator training simulator (OTS) and reliability based maintenance (RBM) services contracts by JSC EuroCh ...

Read more
www.worldofchemicals.com uses cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. X