Researchers develop new energy process method lowering cotton bleaching technique’s high temperatures

New low- energy process to bleach cotton

6:46 AM, 31st May 2014
New techniques lowering  cotton bleaching technique’s high temperatures

WASHINGTON DC, US: With a growing number of consumers demanding more earth-friendly practices from the fashion world, scientists are developing new ways to produce textiles that could help meet rising expectations. They report in the ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research one such method that can dramatically reduce the amount of energy it takes to bleach cotton while improving the quality of the popular material.

Researcher Quan Zu and colleagues point out that the cotton industry’s current whitening techniques require bleaching the natural fibre at very high temperatures with hydrogen peroxide. Although this method results in the bright white material consumers have grown so fond of, it also lowers the quality of the material and takes a lot of energy to carry out. Multiply that by the 7.3 billion pounds of cotton produced in the US alone, and the energy needs soar. To cut down on the energy the textile industry uses to make cotton, Zu’s team targeted its efforts toward lowering the bleaching technique’s high temperatures.

 

They developed a novel compound that, when used with hydrogen peroxide, drops the bleaching temperature down to 140 degrees Fahrenheit from 200 degrees. The authors estimated that 60 degree difference would result in a process requiring less than half the energy as the commercial technique. It also produced less wastewater, improved the weight of the material and performed its original function - whitening the cotton. Since many materials destined to become clothing eventually take on various hues, the scientists also tested dyes and found the cotton bleached at the lower temperature could be made just as vibrant as its high-heat counterpart. They successfully showed the treatment’s effectiveness on knitted cotton fabric in commercial scale trials.
© American Chemical Society News

0 Comments

Login

Your Comments (Up to 2000 characters)
Please respect our community and the integrity of its participants. WOC reserves the right to moderate and approve your comment.

Related News


Algae biofuel can meet world’s energy demand, say scientists

WASHINGTON DC, US: According to scientists, micro-algae-based biofuel has the potential to quench a sizeable chunk of the world’s energy demands ...

Read more
Solazyme, Bunge JV begin commercial production in Brazil

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, US: Solazyme, Inc, a renewable oil and bioproducts company, and its joint venture with Bunge Global Innovation LLC, a wholly-owne ...

Read more
Lenzing to implement cost reduction measures

LENZING, AUSTRIA: The Lenzing Group will be implementing additional cost reduction measures, due to the very unsatisfactory development of prices on t ...

Read more
Lubrizol, Sekisui gets approval for chlorinated PVC plant in Thailand

CLEVELAND, US: The Lubrizol Corporation has received all necessary regulatory approvals for its previously announced joint investment in a chlorinated ...

Read more
Flint Hills Resources to acquire PetroLogistics

HOUSTON/WICHITA, US: Flint Hills Resources LLC, a subsidiary of Koch Industries, has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire PetroLogistics LP, ...

Read more
Scientists map more than 17,000 proteins in human body

BANGALORE, INDIA: For the first time in the world, a group of Indian scientists working in Bangalore, along with their American counterparts, have map ...

Read more