Scientists exploringchili pepper’s effect helps develop new drug

New pain drug targets chili pepper receptor

9:54 AM, 21st August 2014
Scientists exploring the chili pepper’s effect helps develop a new drug
A new drug candidate for pain targets the ‘chili-pepper receptor.’

WASHINGTON DC, US: Scientists are exploring the chili pepper’s effect using their findings to develop a new drug candidate for many kinds of pain, which can be caused by inflammation or other problems. They reported their progress on the compound, which is being tested in clinical trials, in ACS’ Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

Researchers Laykea Tafesse and colleagues explained that decades ago, scientists had pegged a compound called capsaicin as the active ingredient in chili peppers that causes fiery pain. In the 1990s, researchers were able to sequence the genetic sequence for the protein “receptor” that capsaicin attaches to in the body. The receptor is a protein on cells that acts as a gate, allowing only certain substances into a cell. The advance launched a hunt for compounds that can block this gate, cut off the pain signal and potentially treat pain that current drugs are no match for. Some of the molecules resulting from this search have been tested in people but cause unwanted side effects, or they wouldn’t work well as oral medication. Tafesse’s team wanted to explore variations on this theme to find a better drug candidate.

They produced more than two dozen similar compounds, each with its own unique molecular tweak. They tested them in the lab and in animals for the traits they were looking for, such as potency, safety, the ability to dissolve in water and whether they can be taken orally. One prospect showed the most promise, and it has advanced into clinical trials.

 

© American Chemical Society News

0 Comments

Login

Your Comments (Up to 2000 characters)
Please respect our community and the integrity of its participants. WOC reserves the right to moderate and approve your comment.

Related News


Sunscreens causes hazards to sea life

WASHINGTON DC, US: In a new study, scientists are reporting that the use of sunscreen in beaches causes environmental hitch. When certain sunblock ing ...

Read more
Foster Wheeler bags Iberdrola’s heat recovery steam generator contract in Mexico

ZUG, SWITZERLAND: Foster Wheeler AG’s subsidiary of Global Power Group has been awarded a contract by Iberdrola, for the design and supply of a ...

Read more
Reliance to import 1.5 million tonne ethane from US

NEW DELHI, INDIA: Reliance Industries Ltd (RIL) is implementing a project to import 1.5 million tonne of ethane to feed its crackers in India, taking ...

Read more
Uralchem becomes controlling shareholder in Ventamonjaks

MOSCOW, RUSSIA: Uralchem, OJSC has become a controlling shareholder in SIA Ventamonjaks, largest liquid ammonia transhipment terminal in the Baltic Se ...

Read more
DuPont to sell copper fungicide business to Mitsui

WILMINGTON, US: DuPont Crop Protection announced an agreement with Mitsui & Co Ltd for the sale of DuPont’s global Kocide and ManKocide copp ...

Read more
LG Chem targets to become global player in reverse osmosis membranes

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA: South Korean petrochemicals company, LG Chem, has unveiled plans to become a global player in the market for reverse osmosis membr ...

Read more