New way control cellular reaction regenerating tissues

New way to control cellular reaction for regenerating tissues

6:15 AM, 14th November 2016
Cellular characteristics and activities that may be influenced by the interaction between cells and nanoscale topographies.
Cellular characteristics and activities that may be influenced by the interaction between cells and nanoscale topographies.

TSUKUBA, JAPAN: Researchers are trying to discover new methods to control cellular reaction in vitro using engineered materials in a continuous interest to regenerate injured or diseased tissues. Recent studies have found that nanoscale structure of the materials, on which such cells are cultured, affect how well they proliferate and develop into the tissues they are meant to become.

Researchers from the University of Malaya in Malaysia, Dr Belinda Pingguan-Murphy et al, together with Prof Sheik Ali Akbar of Ohio State University, investigated the latest research on how the nanoscale topographies influence cellular regenerative responses.

The research is published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials.

For instance, human fetal osteoblast cells that are included in bone formation were found to develop better on materials that had small protrusions on their surfaces (11 nanometers in height) compared to surfaces that were either flat or had higher protrusions. They also attached better to surfaces with nanosized pits that were 14 nm or 29 nm deep compared to flat surfaces and surfaces with pits that were 45 nm deep.

They also found that the distance between pits or protrusions and whether they are random or highly ordered also affect how osteoblasts and stem cells respond. Additionally, nanoscale grooved surfaces trigger these cells to grow in the direction of the grooves.

Normally, when a material is exposed to a biological fluid, water molecules bind rapidly to the surface followed by the incorporation of chloride and sodium ions. Proteins then adsorb to this surface. The resulting mixture of proteins, as well as their three-dimensional shape and orientation with respect to the surface topography, sends signals to the cells influencing their attachment and spreading.

More research in this area may lead to the development of clinical prostheses with topographies that can directly modulate stem cell fate, enabling cell growth and development to be tailored to a specific application without using potentially harmful chemicals, said the researchers. However, developing low-cost, high-output fabrication techniques that allow for the development of specific nano-topographies is still a limiting factor.

© Worldofchemicals News

0 Comments

Login

Your Comments (Up to 2000 characters)
Please respect our community and the integrity of its participants. WOC reserves the right to moderate and approve your comment.

Related News


Albemarle appoints current CEO as its new chairman

CHARLOTTE, US: Albemarle Corporation has elected the current president and chief executive officer (CEO), Luke Kissam as its new chairman. He acc ...

Read more
Wacker starts operations at its pilot reactor for dispersions in China

MUNICH, GERMANY/ NANJING, CHINA: Wacker Chemie AG officially begins operations at its new pilot reactor for vinyl acetate-ethylene copolymer (VAE) dis ...

Read more
BASF’s functional pigments keep racing yacht cool

SOUTHFIELD, US: Ocean Masters World Champion skipper Alex Thomson’s new IMOCA 60 racing yacht is the first entirely black IMOCA 60 yacht in the ...

Read more
Covestro’s new wearables for medical diagnostics, treatments

LEVERKUSEN, GERMANY: Influenced by its long experience in the medical industry with regard to patient’s comfort and converter processing efficie ...

Read more
Gevo expands gasoline distribution partnership with Musket

ENGLEWOOD, US: Gevo Inc has started to sell gasoline mixed with its isobutanol for automobile usage in Houston area. This marks the first time that Ge ...

Read more
Trump’s presidency –Mixed bag for chemical sector

BANGALORE, INDIA: The win of Republican Donald Trump in the US presidential election will have a significant policy effect on the chemical industry. H ...

Read more
www.worldofchemicals.com uses cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. X