Rochester university researcher developed highly customizable coatings foam like polymers

Newly developed process for foam-like polymer coatings

4:48 AM, 15th October 2013
Rochester university research news
Mitchell Anthamatten, Chemical Engineer, University of Rochester.

ROCHESTER, US: Polymers, the essential component of plastics, are found in countless commercial, medical, and industrial products. Polymers that are porous are called foam polymers and are especially useful because they combine light weight with rigid mechanical properties. Now a researcher at the University of Rochester has developed a process to grow highly customizable coatings of foam-like polymers.

The process, developed by Mitchell Anthamatten, Chemical Engineer, University of Rochester, involves growing foam polymers directly from gases. The findings are published in the journal Macromolecular Rapid Communications.

“With this process we can grow polymer coatings in which the density and pore structure varies in space. My hope is that the research leads to applications in a wide variety of fields, including medical, manufacturing, and high-tech research,” said Anthamatten.

Anthamatten, working closely with graduate student Ran Tao, developed a system in which a mixture of gases is pumped into a low pressure reactor containing a cold surface to encourage condensation. One of the condensed liquids actually forms the polymer material (think of the solid part of a sponge), while the other one temporarily occupies the spaces that become the pores in the foam material (think of the hollow part of a sponge). But the problem is that the liquids in the film don’t mix well - very much like water and oil. What’s required is to quickly solidify the polymer film, just as the two liquids begin to separate from one another. By controlling the solidification rate, they could control the size and distribution of the pores; the faster the coating is solidified, the smaller the pores become.

Anthamatten and Tao found the answer by adjusting the rate at which the gases were fed into the system, changing the temperature of the cold surface in the reactor, and using a chemical agent that helps solidify the coating. By adjusting all those factors, they were able to coat foam polymers with different densities, thicknesses, shapes, and hole-sizes.

“This process is highly customizable, meaning that we can make adjustments along the way, shaping the material’s pore structure and density as it is grown. As a result, it will be easier to put foam polymers in hard-to-get-at places, or even on curved surfaces,” said Anthamatten.

© University of Rochester News 

0 Comments

Login

Your Comments (Up to 2000 characters)
Please respect our community and the integrity of its participants. WOC reserves the right to moderate and approve your comment.

Related News


Oman Oil to acquire Oxea from Advent International

MUSCAT, OMAN: The Oman Oil Company agreed to buy German chemicals maker Oxea from buyout firm Advent International to expand into downstream activitie ...

Read more
Gelatin can replace platinum in fuel cells, finds new study

BIRMINGHAM, UK: New research by researchers at University of Birmingham has found that a substance made from gelatin could be used to replace platinum ...

Read more
Clariant expands dehydrogenation catalysts capacity in Kentucky, US

MUTTENZ, SWITZERLAND: Clariant, a world leader in specialty chemicals, has successfully expanded production capacity for Houdry dehydrogenation cataly ...

Read more
Air Products appoints new head of Merchant Gases, Corning Painter

LEHIGH VALLEY, US: Air Products has appointed Corning F Painter to the position of senior vice president and general manager, Merchant Gases. He succe ...

Read more
Chemtura to sell consumer products business for $315 million

PHILADELPHIA, US: Chemtura Corporation has entered into a stock purchase agreement to sell its Consumer Products business, including dedicated manufac ...

Read more
Lanxess opens carbon dioxide concentration unit in Newcastle, South Africa

NEWCASTLE, SOUTH AFRICA: Specialty chemicals company Lanxess has commissioned a new carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration unit at its Newcastle productio ...

Read more