Seaweed-based water bubbles set replace plastic bottles

Seaweed-based water bubbles set to replace plastic bottles

9:45 AM, 15th April 2017
Seaweed-based water bubbles set to replace plastic bottles
Ooho is an edible jelly-like water bubble, made from a seaweed extract.

LONDON, UK: Skipping Rocks Lab, an innovative sustainable packaging start-up based in London, UK has introduced its first product Ooho, a sustainable packaging alternative to plastic bottles.

Ooho is an edible jelly-like bubble, made from a seaweed extract. It is completely biodegradable and so natural that you can actually eat it! Ooho packets are flexible sachets of water, drunk by tearing a hole and pouring into your mouth, or consumed whole. Our packaging is cheaper than plastic and can compress any beverage including water, soft drinks, spirits, and even cosmetics, the company said.

The consumption of non-renewable resources for single-use bottles and the amount of waste generated is profoundly unsustainable. The aim of Ooho is to provide the convenience of plastic bottles while limiting the environmental impact.

What is Ooho?

  • It is 100 percent made of plants & seaweed
  • Biodegradable in 4-6 weeks, just like a piece of fruit
  • It is edible, can be flavoured and coloured
  • Fresh (shelf life of a few days)
  • 5x less CO2, 9x less Energy vs PET
  • Cheaper than plastic

Skipping Rocks Lab told the Telegraph that the material is cheaper than producing a plastic water bottle. To create the balls, a block of ice is dipped in a solution of calcium chloride and brown algae, and the membrane forms around it. A layer can be peeled off to keep the exterior clean for consumption.

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