Tiny DNA pyramids kills bacteria more efficiently

Tiny DNA pyramids kill bacteria more efficiently

6:39 AM, 12th July 2014
Tiny DNA pyramids
DNA pyramids, made with gold (Au) trackers and the germ-killer actinomycin D, are a potential new weapon in fighting bacterial infections.

WASHINGTON DC, US: Bacterial infections usually announce themselves with pain and fever but often can be defeated with antibiotics - and then there are those that are sneaky and hard to beat. Now, scientists have built a new weapon against such pathogens in the form of tiny DNA pyramids. Published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, their study found the nanopyramids can flag bacteria and kill more of them than medicine alone.

Researchers David Leong, Jianping Xie and colleagues noted that some infectious pathogens can lie in wait, undetectable in the human body or in places that antibiotics have a hard time accessing. Engineered nanomedicine offers a new way to deliver drugs directly into bacterial cells, but the carriers developed so far pose problems such as toxicity. So Leong’s team decided to use DNA to build a better, safer drug-delivery tool.

They made little pyramids out of DNA that were so small that thousands could fit in the period at the end of this sentence. Then, they attached gold nanomaterials as fluorescent tags and also packaged the drug actinomycin D (AMD) into the struts of the DNA pyramids. In tests on the common bacteria Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, the scientists tracked the nanopyramids as they entered the cells and released the drug payload. This killed 65 per cent of the S. aureus and 48 per cent of the E. coli, compared to 42 per cent and 14 per cent with AMD alone.

 

© American Chemical Society News

0 Comments

Login

Your Comments (Up to 2000 characters)
Please respect our community and the integrity of its participants. WOC reserves the right to moderate and approve your comment.

Related News


Praxair expands industrial gases facilities in New Mexico

DANBURY, US: Praxair, Inc will further expand its industrial gases facilities located in Kirtland, New Mexico. The expansion will include a new nitrog ...

Read more
Sika opens new plant in Brazil

GOIAS, BRAZIL: Sika has opened a new plant in Aparecida de Goiania, state of Goias, mid-western Brazil, which is the seventh plant in this country. Go ...

Read more
DSM acquires vitamin C producer in China

HEERLEN, THE NETHERLANDS: Royal DSM, the global Life Sciences and Materials Sciences company, has reached agreement to acquire Aland (HK) Holding Limi ...

Read more
In Indonesia, labors collect noxious sulphur with bare hands

EAST JAVA, INDONESIA: In Indonesia, people are found collecting sulphur from their hands to make matches and white sugar. Several hundred men work in ...

Read more
BASF starts pilot plant for polyurethane insulating panels in Germany

LEMFORDE, GERMANY: BASF has commissioned a new pilot line for the development and discontinuous production of polyurethane insulating panels at its Le ...

Read more
Nanolab Technologies acquires XPS analytical system in Texas, US

MILPITAS, US: Nanolab Technologies, the providers of analytical services, has purchased a new XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) analytical system ...

Read more