Towards turning smartphones into pollution monitors

Towards turning smartphones into pollution monitors

4:29 AM, 19th February 2015
Towards turning smartphones into pollution monitors
Mobile technology can help pinpoint when and where children are exposed to air pollution.

WASHINGTON DC, US: As urban residents know, air quality is a big deal. When local pollution levels go up, the associated health risks also increase, especially for children and seniors. But air pollution varies widely over the course of a day and by location, even within the same city. Now scientists, reporting in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology, have used smartphone and sensing technology to better pinpoint where and when pollution is at its worst.

Researcher Mark J Nieuwenhuijsen and colleagues noted that many studies have investigated people’s exposure to air pollution, which is associated with respiratory and cardiovascular problems. But they usually create a picture of exposure based on air pollution levels outside people’s homes. This approach ignores big differences in air quality in school and work environments. It also ignores spikes in pollution that happen over the course of the day such as during rush hour. Nieuwenhuijsen’s team wanted to test technology’s ability to fill in these gaps.

The researchers equipped more than 50 school children with smartphones that could track their location and physical activity. The children also received sensors that continuously measured the ambient levels of black carbon, a component of soot.  Although most children spent less than 4 per cent of their day traveling to and from school, commuting contributed to 13 per cent of their total potential black carbon exposure. The researchers concluded that mobile technologies could contribute valuable new insights into air pollution exposure.

 

© American Chemical Society News

0 Comments

Login

Your Comments (Up to 2000 characters)
Please respect our community and the integrity of its participants. WOC reserves the right to moderate and approve your comment.

Related News


BASF, Petronas to build 2-ethylhexanoic acid plant in Malaysia

KUANTAN, MALAYSIA/LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY: BASF and Petronas Chemicals Group Berhad (PCG) will build a new world-scale production plant for 2-ethylhexan ...

Read more
New solders for semiconductors, creates technological possibilities

CHICAGO, US: Research team led by University of Chicago’s Dmitri Talapin has demonstrated how semiconductors can be soldered and still deliver g ...

Read more
Genetically modified apple doesn’t turn brown when sliced, bruised

OKANAGAN, CANADA: The US government approved a genetically modified apple that doesn’t turn brown when bruised or sliced. While most genetic alt ...

Read more
Gold nanotubes can destroy cancer cells, finds new study

LONDON, UK: Gold nanotubes can act as internal nanoprobes for high-resolution imaging, drug delivery vehicles and agents for destroying cancer cells, ...

Read more
BASF doubles capacity at precious metals recycling plant in Cinderford, UK

CINDERFORD, UK/LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY: BASF has completed the installation and start-up of new high-performance milling and decanning equipment at its ...

Read more
Uhde Inventa-Fischer bags contract to build polyamide 6 plant in Poland

TARNOW, POLAND: Uhde Inventa-Fischer has been awarded a major contract from the Polish chemical group Grupa Azoty to build a polyamide 6 plant. The mu ...

Read more
www.worldofchemicals.com uses cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. X